Virgin Galactic

File photo of a modified Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM during a test launch from Vandenberg AFB California

Orbital Presses U.S. Lawmakers To End Ban On Retired Missiles

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) – Orbital ATK is pressing U.S. lawmakers to end a 20-year ban on using decommissioned intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM) for launching commercial satellites and the effort has raised concern among companies that have invested millions of dollars in potential rival rockets.

Orbital Vice President Barron Beneski said in an interview on Friday that the company was pushing Washington to get the ban lifted as part of the National Defense Authorization Act that sets defense policy for fiscal 2017, which begins Oct. 1.

The missiles were idled by nuclear disarmament treaties between the United States and Russia in the 1990s.

Virgin Galactic and other space startups said in interviews last week they worry that lifting the ban would give Orbital an unfair competitive advantage if it was allowed to use surplus government rocket motors in its commercial launch vehicles.

The issue could affect hundreds of millions of dollars in potential rocket launch orders in coming years.

Orbital’s initiative dovetails with an Air Force plan to cut the amount of money it spends on missile storage and support services to $6.5 million in fiscal year 2017 from $17 million this year.

The Air Force had no immediate comment on the budget cut proposal and its intentions for the stockpiled missiles.

U.S. policy allows the missile rocket motors to be used to launch military payloads, a service that Orbital has already been providing under contract with the Air Force. But the decommissioned missiles cannot currently be used as launch vehicles to fly commercial satellites.

Orbital said it wants the missiles to build a Minotaur 4 launch vehicle capable of lifting about four times the weight of small rockets like LauncherOne, which is being developed by Richard Branson’s California-based Virgin Galactic.

“It’s not a matter of us taking business away from them. It’s a matter of us filling a void in the Minotaur 4 market and competing it internationally,” Orbital’s vice president of business development Mark Pieczynski said.

Beneski said the company would welcome continued Department of Defense review “to make sure we’re not buying assets and then cannibalizing the commercial market.”

They said Orbital was not looking for an exclusive deal, and would pay a “fair market rate” for the retired missiles.

Virgin Galactic Vice President Richard DalBello said on Friday that his company did not expect a large commercial market in the class of the Minotaur. “What they will be doing is selling rides to smaller commercial payloads, and aggregating them, so they will be directly competing with us,” he said.

Virgin is among a handful of startups that include Texas-based Firefly Space Systems and Rocket Lab of Los Angeles and New Zealand, which have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in developing rockets (lower case) to carry small satellites into orbit.

“It’s a dangerous precedent when the government tries to inject itself in the commercial marketplace. It can be disruptive, and not for the right reasons,” Eric Stallmer, president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, a Washington DC-based trade organization, said in an interview on Thursday.

(Reporting by Irene Klotz; editing by Andrea Shalal and Joe White)

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Branson’s Virgin Galactic Unveils New Spaceship

MOJAVE, Calif. (Reuters) – Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic venture unveiled a new passenger spacecraft on Friday, nearly 16 months after a fatal accident destroyed its sister ship during a test flight over California’s Mojave Desert.

 

The rollout of the gleaming craft, dubbed Virgin Space Ship Unity, marks Branson’s return to a race among rival billionaire entrepreneurs to develop a vehicle that can take thrill-seekers, researchers and commercial customers on short hops into space.

“It’s almost too good to be true,” Branson said during a ceremony at the Mojave Air and Space Port, about 100 miles (160 km) north of Los Angeles. “When I saw it for the first time, it brought an immediate lump to my throat and tears to my eyes. It was a completely overwhelming moment.”

Christened with a bottle of milk by Branson’s year-old granddaughter, the ship was painted bright white on its front section, fading to gray and black toward the tail.

Richard Branson (R) stands with his son Sam (L) and daughter-in-law Isabella (2nd R) as he watches his one-year-old granddaughter Eva-Deia (2nd L) break a milk bottle to dedicate the new Space Ship Two, a six-passenger two-pilot vehicle meant to ferry people into space, that replaces a rocket destroyed during a test flight in October 2014, in Mojave, California, United States, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Richard Branson (R) stands with his son Sam (L) and daughter-in-law Isabella (2nd R) as he watches his one-year-old granddaughter Eva-Deia (2nd L) break a milk bottle to dedicate the new Space Ship Two, a six-passenger two-pilot vehicle meant to ferry people into space, that replaces a rocket destroyed during a test flight in October 2014, in Mojave, California, United States, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

The tail itself was emblazoned with a blue image of a peering eye belonging to famed British physicist Stephen Hawking.

Branson has already offered a flight into space to Hawking, who is confined to a wheelchair and suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. It was Hawking who suggested naming the ship Unity.

“I have always dreamed of spaceflight, but for so many years I thought it was just that – a dream,” Hawking said in a recorded message played at the space port. “If I am able to go, and if Richard will still take me, I will be proud to fly on this spaceship.”

From outward appearances, the spacecraft is nearly identical to the one lost on Oct. 31, 2014. The accident was blamed on pilot error and oversights by Northrop Gumman Corp’s Scaled Composites division, which designed, built and tested the vehicle, known as SpaceShipTwo.

Virgin Galactic’s own manufacturing arm, The Spaceship Company, already was well into construction of the successor ship when the accident occurred.

The biggest difference between the two is the addition of a pin to prevent a pilot from unlocking the ship’s rotating tail section too soon before descent, which is what triggered the breakup of the first spaceship, said Galactic Chief Executive George Whitesides.

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Sir Richard Branson (C) poses with his mother Eve (C-R) and future astronauts after unveiling the new SpaceShipTwo, a six-passenger two-pilot vehicle meant to ferry people into space that replaces a rocket destroyed during a test flight in October 2014, in Mojave, California, United States, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

The two-pilot, six-passenger spaceship is designed to reach altitudes of 62 miles (100 km) above the planet, providing a few minutes of weightlessness and a view of Earth set against the blackness of space. Nearly 700 people have signed up for rides, which cost $250,000 each.

Other changes include a device to prevent pilots from releasing the ship’s landing gear too early and new control switches to make them more distinct.

Friday’s unveiling set the stage for Unity’s first round of test flights. The company has declined to discuss a schedule, but Whitesides said he expects to rapidly repeat milestones the first craft achieved and then incrementally test the new ship at higher speeds and altitudes. The first spaceship had not yet traveled beyond the atmosphere.

Virgin Galactic is among a handful of companies, including Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, Paul Allen’s Stratolaunch Systems and Boeing <BA.N>, planning to fly people in space.

Building a vehicle that can safely carry humans to the weightless heights beyond Earth’s upper atmosphere is a feat so far achieved only by NASA, Russia, China and Scaled Composites, which designed and flew Virgin Galactic’s prototype craft, SpaceShipOne.

Three suborbital hops by SpaceShipOne in 2004 earned it the $10 million Ansari XPrize.

(Reporting by Irene Klotz; Editing by Steve Gorman and Tom Brown)

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