Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views : Ad Clicks : Ad Views :

This Is What The Earth’s Next Super Continent Could Look Like

/
/
/
424 Views

Our next supercontinent is called Amasia, and it’s expected to fully form 50-200 million years from now.

If you look at a map, you may notice that continents look like they fit together like puzzle pieces. And that’s because they do; roughly 400 million years ago our continents formed one massive land mass known as Pangea. Today’s most prominent remnant of the supercontinent is Brazil’s bulge which seems like it’s locking into West Africa’s dimple.

Using powerful computer programs researchers from around the world are piecing together long lost worlds and future land masses such as Amasia, our potential next supercontinent.

An article in ScienceNews explores the concept and consults researchers on the idea of continental drift. There’s little doubt that our continents our moving, but there is speculation about what the future of our planet may look like.

“Speculation about the future supercontinent Amasia is exactly that, speculation. But there’s hard science behind the conjecture.” says geologist Ross Mitchell of Curtin University in Perth, Australia. In a paper in the September Geology, Yoshida describes how North America, Eurasia, Australia and Africa will end up merged in the Northern Hemisphere.

Supercontinents come and go over the ages. Amasia, illustrated here from the North Pole, might form in the distant future.

Head over to the original article at ScienceNews to find an interactive timeline of the Earth’s continental shift.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest

Newsletter

Get our Tips and Tricks to your Inbox

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar