Solar System, The Sun

How Long Does It Take To Get To The Sun?

The fastest moving space vehicles are referred to as Helios probes. They have orbited around the sun to gather information about it. These probes travel at approximately 157 miles per hour and they make no stops on the way from Earth to the sun. They reached their destination in about 24.7 days.
How Long Does It Take To Get To The Sun?

The sun is a massive ball of gas and it is hot. When you step outside on a warm summer day, you can feel the heat radiating from it. This often makes it feel closer to Earth than it really is.

Looking at a Trip to the Sun

The sun is approximately 93 million miles away from Earth. To put this into perspective, it would take you about 177 years to reach the sun in a car if you were driving at 60 miles per hour and you did not stop once. It would take about 19 years if you were in a commercial jet that was flying at approximately 550 miles per hour without stopping.

Helios Probes

However, due to the fact that the surface of the sun is approximately 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit, it is not possible for humans to make the trip. Since the trip would be long and something a human could not survive and you’d definitely run out of gas with nowhere to stop, scientists have found ways to get digital information about this ball of gas. There are special robotic probes that have been sent to the sun and the surrounding area. This has allowed scientists to monitor the weather patterns and behaviors associated with the sun.

The fastest moving space vehicles are referred to as Helios probes. They have orbited around the sun to gather information about it. These probes travel at approximately 157 miles per hour and they make no stops on the way from Earth to the sun. They reached their destination in about 24.7 days.

Getting to the sun would certainly be an adventure. However, it is not possible due to its composition. No human would be able to survive it and there is no spacecraft so far that would be able to resist the treacherous conditions.

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Jamie is an amateur astronomer and every day space geek.