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Air Force

Air Force’s Secret Space Plane Has Reached 400 Days In Orbit, And We Still Have No Clue What It’s Doing

The US Air Force secret space plane known as X-37B has reached it’s 400th day in orbit. It’s now on it’s fifth mission and is testing new technology and potentially deploying satellites. What that technology is remains a mystery despite few vague clues from the Air Force.

According to the US Air Force website, the X-37B, also known as the OTV, is being used to demonstrate reusable spacecraft technologies. It shares lineage with the Space Shuttle orbiters which were also able to land horizontally upon re-entry.

The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, or OTV, is an experimental test program to demonstrate technologies for a reliable, reusable, unmanned space test platform for the U.S. Air Force. The primary objectives of the X-37B are twofold; reusable spacecraft technologies for America’s future in space and operating experiments which can be returned to, and examined, on Earth.




 

X-37 Orbital Test Vehicle
The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle waits in the encapsulation cell of the Evolved Expendable Launch vehicle April 5, 2010, at the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Fla. Half of the Atlas V five-meter fairing is visible in the background. (Courtesy photo)



 

Before the most recent launch, the Air Force and NASA even revealed two of the payloads for the first time: a NASA materials science experiment and an ionizing thruster being tested for the Air Force. Those clues have led analysts to speculate with a little more confidence about the X-37B’s purpose.

It’s clear that any technologies tested on an Air Force spaceplane will have some military application, but that doesn’t narrow things down much. In space, it could mean communications, navigation, surveillance, or even anti-satellite and counter-anti-satellite operations. The smart money is on advanced surveillance sensors. The Air Force has never mentioned them directly, but everyone seems confident that they’re flying.

“I think that’s probably what they’re not telling you, that there are payloads in there that might be part of the design for future reconnaissance satellites,” says James Andrew Lewis, director and senior fellow in the Strategic Technologies Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. The Air Force has great interest in developing small, advanced sensors, he says, because it’s “looking to figure out how to transition from big, expensive satellites to smaller but equally capable satellites.”




 

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Jamie Stevens
Jamie is an amateur astronomer and every day space geek.